Premier Aesthetics, 35 Brookside Rd, Standish, Wigan WN1 2TZTel: 07913 444 567

 

Excessive Sweating Treatments

In 2004, the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) approved BOTOX (onabotulinumtoxinA) for the treatment of severe primary axillary hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating of the underarms) in patients unable to obtain relief using antiperspirants.

Botox has been shown to result in an 82-87% decrease in sweating. Results start to be noticeable approximately 2 to 4 days after treatment with the full effects usually noted within 2 weeks. Dryness typically lasts 4 to 7 months.

Additional statistics from published research studies have shown that repeated treatment with Botox is safe and effective for hyperhidrosis and consistently results in meaningful, long-lasting improvements in an excessive sweating patient’s symptoms, daily functioning, and quality of life.

While sweating is an essential body function for temperature-control, localized body areas house only a small percentage of the body's sweat glands (the underarms, for instance, are home to less than 2% of the body’s sweat glands.) The temporary cessation of these sweat glands' functioning, therefore, has little to do with body thermoregulation. Compensatory sweating (sweating on other body parts, common after ETS surgery) has not been found to be a concern.

Prior to Botox injections in the underarms, it’s best not to shave that area. Many physicians, in fact, prefer three to four days of hair growth prior to Botox injections.

During the procedure, a very fine needle is used to inject tiny amounts of Botox just under the skin intermittently throughout the area of excessive sweating (in a grid pattern, approximately every 1 to 2 centimeters.) Multiple injections are given based on your doctor's assessment of the area that needs to be treated.

Post treatment advice - refraining from intensive exercise or the use of a sauna on the day of the injections).